Frequently Asked Questions

A Healthcare Flexible Spending Account, or "FSA," is a pre-tax benefit account that you can use to pay for eligible medical, dental, and vision care expenses that aren’t covered by your health insurance plan. You decide how much to contribute to your Healthcare FSA each year, and funds are withdrawn automatically from each paycheck for deposit into your account before taxes are deducted. The total amount you elect to contribute to your Healthcare FSA each year is available on the first day of your plan year.
Generally, you need to spend the funds in your Healthcare FSA within the plan year. However, your employer may provide you a grace period of 2-½ months after the end of the plan year to spend funds left in your account. Or your employer may allow you to carry over up to $500 left in your account into the next plan year.
You fund your Healthcare FSA through your employer. During your company's Open Enrollment period, you tell your employer how much you would like to contribute to your account for the coming year. The maximum amount you can contribute is determined by the IRS. Your employer then deducts your contribution amount (in equal portions) from your paychecks throughout the plan year. And the good news - you don't have to wait for funds to build up in your Healthcare FSA! Your entire annual election amount is available to you on the first day of your plan year. If your plans allows you to carry funds from the previous plan year (up to $500), that counts in addition to your maximum annual contribution, so you could have a balance of as much as $3,050.
A lot of different kinds, you would be surprised. Your Healthcare FSA covers hundreds of eligible healthcare expenses, like co-payments for doctor visits, prescription drugs, and new eyeglasses or contact lenses. Please keep in mind that IRS rules determine which expenses are eligible, and some expenses require a doctor's note or prescription to be eligible for reimbursement under your HealthcareFSA.
Your Healthcare FSA does not cover these expenses:
  • Cosmetic surgery and procedures
  • Dental whitening
  • Expenses for healthcare services rendered outside the coverage period
  • Expenses reimbursed by an insurance provider or another health plan
  • Family or marriage counseling
  • Herbs, vitamins, supplements, or other over-the-counter items used for general health
  • Insurance premiums
  • Personal use items (e.g., toothpaste, shaving cream, cosmetics)
  • There are several ways you can use the funds in your Healthcare FSA:
  • You can use the Debit Card associated with your Healthcare FSA to pay for eligible healthcare products and services.
  • You can arrange to have your healthcare provider paid directly from your Healthcare FSA.
  • You can also be reimbursed for the eligible expenses you pay out of pocket.
  • It depends on the type of Healthcare FSA program your employer has in place. There are three scenarios for funds that are left unspent in your account at the end of the plan year:
  • If you have a Healthcare FSA with Carryover, you can carry over up to $500 into the next plan year.
  • If you have a Healthcare FSA with Grace Period, you have up to 2½ months after the end of the plan year to use unspent funds before you lose them.
  • If you have a standard Healthcare FSA, you lose any unspent funds at the end of the plan year.
  • Your employer decides on which type of FSA account they offer.
    Unfortunately, we can't be too specific with this answer because it depends on your employer's Healthcare FSA program. Often employers offer a period of time when you can still submit claims so you can spend down funds remaining in your Healthcare FSA. You may also be able to extend the period of time to use your Healthcare FSA funds if you elect COBRA after you leave your job. But please keep in mind that you need to incur all eligible expenses before your last day of work. We recommend asking your employer about your options.
    Sorry, you can only change the amount you contribute to your Healthcare FSA if you meet one of these special circumstances, which are determined by the IRS:
  • A change in marital status (such as marriage, divorce, or death of your spouse)
  • A change in the number of your dependents (such as the birth or adoption of a child, or death of a dependent)
  • A change in employment status of you, your spouse, or your dependent
  • An event that causes your dependent to satisfy or cease to satisfy an eligibility requirement for a particular benefit
  • A change in residence of you, your spouse, or your dependent
  • A change in cost in coverage
  • If you believe you qualify for a change of your election, please contact your employer.
    Sorry, you can only change your election if you meet any of these special circumstances, which are determined by the IRS:
  • A change in marital status (such as marriage, divorce or death of your spouse)
  • A change in the number of your dependents (such as birth or adoption of a child, or death of a dependent)
  • A change in employment status of you, your spouse, or dependent
  • An event that causes your dependent to satisfy or cease to satisfy an eligibility requirement for a particular benefit
  • A change in residence of you, your spouse, or dependent
  • A change in cost in coverage
  • If you believe you qualify for a change of your election, please contact your employer. And if your employer offers carryover, don't forget you can carry over up to $500 of unused funds into the next plan year, so you won't lose them, even if you don't spend them in the first year.
    Sorry, your domestic partner's medical expenses cannot be reimbursed under your Healthcare FSA, according to current IRS Regulations. You must be legally married to use your Healthcare FSA to pay for your spouse's eligible healthcare expenses.
    A Letter of Medical Necessity is the same as a Doctor's Statement. It's a letter written by your doctor, verifying that the medication you are buying with your Healthcare FSA is for a diagnosis, treatment, or prevention of a disease. This letter is required by the IRS for certain eligible expenses.
    A Doctor's Statement is the same as Letter of Medical Necessity. It's a letter written by your doctor, verifying that the medication you are buying with your Healthcare FSA is for a diagnosis, treatment, or prevention of a disease. This statement is required by the IRS for certain eligible expenses.
    No. Although both are Flexible Spending Accounts, a Healthcare FSA is very different from a Dependent Care FSA. A Healthcare FSA is to help you pay for healthcare expenses for you and your dependents. A Dependent Care FSA is to help you pay for childcare and elder care expenses so you can continue to work.
    A Healthcare FSA with Carryover is a type of Healthcare FSA that may be offered by your employer. With this type of Healthcare FSA, you can carry over up to $500 remaining in your account from one plan year to the next. To find out if you have a Healthcare FSA with Carryover, log into your EMPOWER account or ask your employer. Browse the Healthcare FSA with Carryover FAQs for more information.
    A run-out period is a timeframe in the new plan year during which you can file claims for expenses incurred in the previous plan year. This timeframe is established by your employer not the IRS. While timeframes vary from employer to employer, a 90-day run-out period is common. If your plan year ends on December 31, and you have a 90-day run-out period, you have until March 31 of the following plan year to use money left in your Healthcare FSA.
    Typically funds in a Healthcare FSA are used first to pay for eligible expenses. But your HRA is customized by your employer; therefore, your plan may be different. We recommend that you ask your employer for details on your HRA.
    There are two ways to submit a receipt for reimbursement: Through the MYFLEXMOBILE app. Use your mobile device to snap a photo of your receipts and submit them for reimbursement. Though your EMPOWER account.
    Carryover is an option for Healthcare FSAs that became available in 2013. The carryover option lets you carry over up to $500 remaining in your account from one plan year to the next.
    FSAStore.com is the only one-stop online shop stocked exclusively with Healthcare FSA-eligible products and services. EMPOWER has partnered with FSAStore.com to make it even easier for you to use your Healthcare FSA dollars and get the best value from each dollar spent. Every item for sale at FSAStore.com is eligible for Healthcare FSA reimbursement and there are more than 4,000 eligible products to choose from.
    Yes! FSAStore.com is the only one-stop online shop stocked exclusively with Healthcare FSA-eligible products and services. EMPOWER has partnered with FSAStore.com to make it even easier for you to use your Healthcare FSA dollars and get the best value from each dollar spent. Every item for sale at FSAStore.com is eligible for Healthcare FSA reimbursement and there are more than 4,000 eligible products to choose from.
    If you use your VISA® Debit Card to pay for FSAStore.com items, then no, you typically don't have to submit receipts to verify the eligibility of your purchases. FSAStore.com is a certified IIAS merchant, and EMPOWER can verify the eligibility of your purchase without needing additional documentation in most cases. Keep in mind that if you use another credit card to pay for FSAStore.com items and submit a claim for reimbursement, you need to submit a receipt to verify the eligibility of your purchase. We recommend that you always keep receipts in the event that information needs to be verified.
    To find out if you have a Healthcare FSA with Carryover, log into your EMPOWER account or ask your employer.
    The carryover option is available with a Healthcare FSA and an HSA-Compatible FSA. It is not available with a Dependent Care FSA
    Your funds will be available on the first day of the new plan year. The amount that's carried over is determined at the end of any run-out period for the previous plan year.
    Good news! No. You can still contribute up to $2,550 (or the limit set by your employer) even if you carry over $500 from the previous plan year.
    Sorry, your employer can only offer a Healthcare FSA with a grace period OR the carryover option during the same plan year not both.
    Your employer can choose to allow a carryover of any amount up to $500 per participating employee per plan year. EMPOWER encourages all employers to allow the maximum $500 carryover amount.
    Your carryover balance is available to you on the first day of the new plan year. You do not have to make a new contribution election for the new plan year to receive the carryover funds
    If you don't re-elect a Healthcare FSA, your employer may make some options available to you, including:
  • Your carryover balance may be defaulted to a Healthcare FSA for the new plan year automatically; or
  • Your carryover balance may default to an HSA-Compatible FSA; or
  • You may forfeit your previous plan year balance rather than carry it over to the new plan year.
  • Ask your employer which option applies to you.
    Great news! Funds may be carried over indefinitely. There is no time limit. Keep in mind that your employer may choose to limit the years that carried over funds can be accessed. For example, if you have unused funds from Plan Year 1, you make no election in Plan Year 2, and you don't submit any claims for Plan Year 1, your employer may choose to have the unused amounts of Plan Year 1 expire at the end of the Plan Year 2. Ask your employer if there are any limits to how long your unused funds may carry over from one plan year to the next.
    Sorry, carryover balances are nontransferable. You must be an active participant on the last day of the plan year in order to have funds carried over to the next plan year.
    Yes, the $500 carryover option is available for any Healthcare FSA contribution level your employer elects.
    No. If you don't re-enroll in a Healthcare FSA for the new plan year, but you still have funds remaining in your account to be carried over, you will be automatically re-enrolled in a Healthcare FSA for the new plan year with an election amount of $0.
    No. If any funds remain in your Healthcare FSA at the end of the current plan year, you carry over up to $500 into the subsequent year, indefinitely. Your carryover balance can be used at any time for expenses incurred in the new plan year (in addition to the elected payroll deductions).
    Log into your EMPOWER account. Your account balance, including your carryover balance, and other important account information will show up in a pop-up window. This window will pop up each time you log into your account before the plan end date.
    A Health Savings Account, or "HSA," is like a 401(k) for healthcare. This pre-tax benefit account, in conjunction with your qualified high-deductible health plan, is used to pay for eligible out-of-pocket medical, vision, and dental expenses. You can earn interest on the money in your account and invest it so that it grows over time. An HSA works like a Healthcare Flexible Spending Account (FSA), except that the money in your account is yours if you leave your company or if you have money left over at the end of the plan year.
    There are two ways to fund your HSA: Automatic payroll deductions. During your company's Open Enrollment period, tell your employer how much you would like to contribute to your HSA for the coming plan year. Your employer will deduct that amount (in equal portions) from your paychecks, before taxes are deducted, throughout the plan year. Direct contributions. You can contribute additional funds to your HSA at any time. While these contributions aren't tax-free, they can be deducted on your tax return. And keep in mind that you only have access to the funds that have been deducted from your paycheck. Your HSA does not fully fund on the first day of the plan year.
    For 2016, the annual contribution limits are: $3,350 if you are covered by an individual HDHP policy $6,750 if you are covered by a family HDHP policy. Exception: If you are age 55 or older as of December 31, 2016, you may contribute an extra $1,000 as a catch-up deduction under both individual and family policy coverage for 2016. These limits are set by the IRS and may change year to year.
    Unlike a Healthcare FSA, the funds in your HSA must accumulate in your account before you can use them. You can easily monitor your balance in your EMPOWER account either online or on our Mobile App so you are always aware of your latest balance.
    Eligible individuals who are over age 55 by the end of the calendar year are allowed to make additional ontributions to their HSAs. The catch-up contribution is set by the IRS and the limit for 2016 is $1,000.
    Yes; however, the catch-up contribution can be combined and put into one HSA: each spouse must open an HSA and put the catch-up amount into his/her own respective HSA.
    Yes, you can contribute to your HSA as long as you are an eligible individual and have not enrolled in Medicare Part A, B, or D. Once you enroll in Medicare you may no longer contribute to your HSA. For example, if you enroll in Medicare on July 21, you are no longer eligible to contribute to an HSA as of July 1. Your maximum contribution for that year would be for 6 months of that year (you were eligible the first six months of the year.) Remember to also include ½ of the catch-up amount for that year. If you turn age 65 and are still working and are not enrolled in Medicare, you are still eligible to contribute to your HSA.
    If you enroll in a qualified HDHP midyear,* you may still make the maximum annual contribution into your HSA. However, you must remain enrolled in the plan until the end of the following calendar year in order to avoid potential tax issues. * You need to enroll in a qualified HDHP prior to December 1.
    You may contribute to your HSA until your tax filing due date (for most people, that date April 15 of the year following the tax year).
    You'd be surprised by how many different kinds of expenses are covered under an HSA. In general, you can use your HSA to pay for any qualified medical expense. Qualified medical expenses are defined by the IRS and include medical care, vision and dental care expenses, prescription drugs, and payments for long term care services and insurance. An HSA may reimburse certain types of insurance premiums, such as COBRA continuation, or any health insurance plan maintained while receiving unemployment compensation under federal or state law for the HSA holder or for his/her spouse or dependents. If you have an HSA and are age 65 or older (whether or not you're entitled to Medicare), you may use your HSA to pay for any deductible health insurance, such as retiree medical coverage other than a Medicare supplemental policy.
    Generally, you cannot treat insurance premiums as qualified medical expenses unless the premiums are for:
  • Long-term care insurance, subject to IRS mandated limits based on age and adjusted annually (see IRS Publication 502: Long-Term Care).
  • Healthcare continuation coverage (such as coverage under COBRA see IRS Publication 502: COBRA Premium Assistance.
  • Healthcare coverage while receiving unemployment compensation under federal or state law.
  • Medicare and other healthcare coverage if you are 65 or older (other than premiums for a Medicare supplemental policy, such as Medigap).

  • For (b) and (c) above, your HSA can be used for your spouse or a dependent meeting the requirement for that type of coverage. For (d) above, if you, the account beneficiary, are not 65 years of age or older, Medicare premiums for coverage of your spouse or a dependent (who is 65 or older) generally are not considered qualified medical expenses.
    Yes, you can withdraw funds from your HSA at any time. But please keep in mind that if you use your HRS funds for any reason other than to pay for a qualified medical expense, those funds will be taxed as ordinary income, and the IRS will impose a 20% penalty. After you reach age 65 or if you become disabled, you can withdraw HSA funds without penalty but the amounts withdrawn will be taxable as ordinary income.
    You may invest your HSA funds in bank accounts, money market accounts, mutual funds, and stocks. You may not invest in collectibles, art, automobiles or real estate. Log into your EMPOWER account to see what kinds of investment options you have. A best practice is to keep a small liquid balance in your HSA to use to pay for current eligible expenses.
    Yes, you can use your HSA to pay the qualified medical expenses for your spouse and dependents, as long as their expenses are not otherwise reimbursed.
    Yes. If an account beneficiary has reached age 65, premiums for Medicare Part D for the account beneficiary, the account beneficiary's spouse, or the account beneficiary's dependents are considered qualified medical expenses.
    No, there is no minimum spending limit for your HSA, and the entire balance can be carried over from year to year.
    No, there are no limits for how much you can carry over from year to year in your HSA.
    Yes, the law allows a one-time transfer of IRA assets to fund an HSA. The amount transferred may not exceed the amount of one year's contribution and individuals must be otherwise eligible to open an HSA. Transfers are not taxable as IRA distributions. However, amounts transferred into an HSA from an IRA are not deductible. IRS Publication 969Â provides more information.
    At age 65, you can withdraw your HSA funds for non-qualified expenses at any time although they are subject to regular income tax. You can avoid paying taxes by continuing to use the funds for qualified medical expenses. For if you are age 65 or older, premiums for Medicare Part A, B, C or D, Medicare HMO, and employee premiums for employer-sponsored health insurance can be paid from an HSA.
    Select your qualified high-deductible health plan and with it, your HSA, either for yourself (individual) or your family during Open Enrollment. Once the plan year starts, you can access your EMPOWER HSA by logging into your account. You may need to first register for your account. Your pre-tax contributions via payroll deductions fund an HSA with HSA Bank, but you can establish an HSA with a qualified HSA trustee or custodian of your choice. This is typically a bank or brokerage firm. Funds remain tax-free, assuming distributions are only taken for eligible healthcare expenses.
    It's easy. Simply decide how much you want to contribute to your HSA each year and funds are automatically withdrawn from your paycheck for deposit into your account before taxes are deducted. This means you pay less in taxes and take home more of your pay. HSA contributions are deposited in an FDIC-insured, interest-bearing account from which you can draw from at any time. You can choose how much you would like to invest and how much you would like to keep available for your eligible medical expenses. Any funds you put into your HSA and don't use during the plan year stays with you, even if you change employers or retire. And it's there for you today, tomorrow, or anytime in the future.
    To qualify and be eligible to make contributions into an HSA, you must meet all of the following conditions: You must be covered by a qualified high-deductible health plan. Ask your employer for details on coverage under your company's high-deductible health plan. You cannot be enrolled in another type of pre-tax healthcare benefit account, such as a Healthcare Flexible Spending Account (FSA) or a Health Reimbursement Arrangement (HRA). This includes being enrolled in your spouse's Healthcare FSA or HRA. You can, however, be enrolled in an HSA-Compatible FSA, which becomes a regular Healthcare FSA once you meet your deductible. You cannot be claimed as a dependent on another person's tax return. You are not entitled to benefits under Medicare.
    No. It doesn't matter how much money you make. Anyone who is covered by a qualified high-deductible health plan is eligible to enroll in an HSA
    A qualified high-deductible health plan, or HDHP is a type of health insurance plan. While an HDHP has a higher annual deductible than a traditional insurance plan, it also offers tremendous savings, including:
  • Lower monthly premiums then traditional health insurance plans
  • Coverage for preventative care services
  • A limit on the total out-of-pocket payment you are required to pay, including deductibles, covered medical expenses, copayments, and co-insurance
  • You must be covered by a qualified HDHP to be eligible to enroll in an HSA.For individual coverage, the HDHP must have an annual deductible of at least $1,300 and annual out-of-pocket expenses (including co-payments and deductibles but not insurance premiums) must not exceed $6,550. For family coverage, the HDHP must have an annual deductible of at least $2,600 and annual out-of-pocket expenses (including co-payments and deductibles but not insurance premiums) must not exceed $13,100. These are the 2016 limits set by the IRS. These limits may change from year to year.
    It depends. If your spouse has an individual health insurance policy with no other insurance, and you are enrolled in a high-deductible health plan, then yes, you are eligible to participate in an HSA. But if your spouse participates in a Healthcare FSA or HRA, and those benefits cover your healthcare expenses too, then no, you are not eligible to participate an HSA. Why? Even though you are not covered by your spouse's health insurance, the IRS considers your spouse's Healthcare FSA or HRA to be “other insurance. An exception would be if your spouse has an HSA-Compatible FSAs or what's sometimes referred to as a limited-purpose HRA that covers vision and dental care expenses only. If your spouse participates in either an HSA-Compatible FSA or a limited-purpose HRA, then yes, you may participate in an HSA.
    If your spouse has a traditional health insurance plan, such as a PPO or HMO, that provides individual coverage only, then yes, you are eligible to participate in an HSA, but only if you are enrolled a high-deductible health plan and your spouse doesn't also have a Healthcare FSA or HRA that covers your healthcare care expenses. If your spouse has a traditional health insurance plan that provides family coverage, and you have not exempted from that coverage, then no, you are not eligible to participate in an HSA. However, if your spouse has a traditional health insurance plan that covers him/her and your children only, then you are eligible to participate in an HSA.
    Yes! As long as you are covered under a qualified high-deductible health plan, you may have an HSA. An HSA is an individual account that is not tied to your employer.
    Yes, you and your spouse may both have an HSA. However, the contributions to both HSAs cannot exceede the annual family limit. The The IRS regulations limit the total amount you both may contribute to your HSAs and for 2016, the annual family contribution limit is $6,750.
    This is one of the best things about an HSA: it's yours! Your HSA is yours and yours alone. It is yours to keep, even if you resign, are terminated, retire from, or change your job. You keep your HSA and all the money in it, but keep in mind that there may be nominal bank fees if you are no longer enrolled in your HSA through your employer. You can even use your HSA to pay for long-term care insurance, COBRA premiums, or other health insurance premiums if you're receiving unemployment benefits.
    Almost anyone can contribute to your HSA - you, your spouse, your employer, your family members. For example, if you enrolled in an HSA through your employer, both you, as the employee, and your employer may make contributions. Additionally, your spouse may contribute to your HSA on behalf of other family members (e.g., your children) as long as the other family members are covered under the high-deductible health plan and are not otherwise insured.
    HSA contributions in excess of the IRS annual contribution limits ($3,350 for individual coverage and $6,650 for family coverage for 2015) are not tax deductible and are generally subject to a 6% excise tax. If you've contributed too much to your HSA this year, you can do one of two things: 1. Remove the excess contributions and the net income attributable to the excess contribution before they file their federal income tax return (including extensions). You'll pay income taxes on the excess removed from your HSA. 2. Leave the excess contributions in your HSA and pay 6% excise tax on excess contributions. Next year you may want to consider contributing less than the annual limit to you HSA to make up for the excess contribution during the previous year.
    An HSA-Compatible FSA is a Flexible Spending Account (FSA) that is compatible with a Health Savings Account (HSA). If you're enrolled in a qualified high-deductible health plan and have an HSA, you can maximize your savings by pairing your HSA with an HSA-Compatible Flexible Spending Account (FSA). This pre-tax benefit account lets you take advantage of the savings power of an HSA and a Healthcare FSA simultaneously. An HSA-Compatible FSA is sometimes referred to as a limited purpose FSA because it is used to pay for eligible dental and vision care expenses only. You decide how much to contribute to your HSA-Compatible FSA each year, and funds are withdrawn automatically from each paycheck for deposit into your account before taxes are deducted. The total amount you elect to contribute is available on the first day of your plan year. Generally, you need to spend the funds in your HSA-Compatible FSA within the plan year. However, your employer may allow you a grace period of 2½ months after the end of the plan year to spend funds left in your account. Or your employer may allow you to carry over up to $500 left in your account into the next plan year.
    Many kinds! Your HSA-Compatible FSA expands on the savings power of your HSA by covering eligible dental and vision care expenses, such as co-payments for dentist visits and new eyeglasses or contact lenses. Please keep in mind that IRS rules determine which expenses are eligible, and that some expenses require a doctor's note or prescription to be eligible for reimbursement under your HSA-Compatible FSA.
    You fund your HSA-Compatible FSA through your employer. During your company's Open Enrollment period, you tell your employer how much you would like to contribute to your account for the coming year. The maximum amount you can contribute is determined by the IRS. Your employer then deducts your contribution amount (in equal portions) from your paychecks throughout the plan year. Good news! You don't have to wait for funds to build up in your HSA-Compatible FSA. Your entire annual election amount is available to you on the first day of your plan year.
    It depends on the type of HSA-Compatible FSA program your employer has in place. There are three scenarios for funds that are left unspent in your account at the end of the plan year:
  • If you have an HSA-Compatible FSA with Carryover, you can carry over up to $500 into the next plan year.
  • If you have an HSA-Compatible FSA with Grace Period, you have up to 2½ months after the end of the plan year to use unspent funds before you lose them.
  • If you have a standard HSA-Compatible FSA, you lose any unspent funds at the end of the plan year.

  • To find out which scenario applies to you, log into your EMPOWER account or ask you employer. We recommend you estimate your annual out-of-pocket dental and vision care expenses carefully.
    For 2015, you can contribute up to $2,550 annually to your HSA-Compatible FSA. If your employer allows you to carry over funds in your account from last year, you may have up to $3,050 in your account. But please check with your employer to see if another contribution limit applies to your organization's HSA-Compatible FSA program.
    There are two ways to use your HSA-Compatible FSA to pay for dental and vision care expenses:
  • Pay Me Back. You can have funds deposited directly into your bank account or a check mailed to reimburse you for eligible expenses you've already paid.
  • Pay by Debit Card. Depending on your employer's plan, you may use the convenient EMPOWER Healthcare Card associated with your account to pay for eligible dental and vision care products and services. This smart card knows which account to draw money from first, your HSA-Compatible FSA or your HSA.
  • It's easy. Log into your EMPOWER account to check account balances, submit and review claims, look up eligible expenses, upload digital copies of receipts, and more. You may also use the handy MyFlexMobile App to snap and store photos of your receipts and manage your account on the go.
    "HRA" stands for "Health Reimbursement Arrangement." An HRA is an employer-sponsored account to reimburse a portion of your eligible out-of-pocket medical expenses, such as deductibles, co-insurance, and pharmacy expenses. It's not an insurance plan; it's a reimbursement program funded entirely by your employer to help you make healthcare more affordable.
    Yes, you can use EMPOWER Healthcare Card to pay for eligible expenses using funds in your HRA. Your employer and IRS Regulations determine which expenses are eligible for reimbursement under your HRA. Log into your EMPOWER account to see what's eligible under your particular HRA. In most cases, EMPOWER Healthcare Card transactions for eligible expenses are automatically approved. But please remember to always save your receipts from your card transactions.
    There are two ways you can use the funds in your HRA:
  • You can use your EMPOWER Healthcare Card associated with your HRA to pay for eligible healthcare products and services.
  • You can also be reimbursed for eligible expenses you pay out of pocket.
  • The expenses covered under your HRA depend on the way your employer has set up their HRA program. Please contact your employer or EMPOWER.
    Your employer and IRS Regulations determine which expenses are eligible for reimbursement under your HRA. However, most HRAs do not cover:
  • Nutritional supplements
  • Health club dues and cosmetic surgery (unless medically necessary and recommended by a doctor)
  • Medical expenses that are not defined as eligible expenses by your employer
  • Medical expenses incurred by you, your spouse, or eligible dependents before your participation in the HRA program was effective.
  • Medical expenses for which you can be reimbursed by another source, such as group health insurance or a self-funded group health plan

  • Typically funds in a Healthcare FSA are used first to pay for eligible expenses. But your HRAs is customized by your employer; therefore, your plan may be different. We recommend that you ask your employer for details on your HRA.
    It depends on the terms of your employer's HRA plan. Your employer's plan may permit you to be reimbursed from your HRA for healthcare expenses incurred by your dependents, or your employer's plan may limit the use of HRA funds to only those expenses incurred by you. We recommend that you refer to your employer's HRA plan materials or contact your HR representative/benefit administrator.
    Your employer sets the rules for your company's HRA program, including which expenses are eligible for reimbursement under your particular HRA.
    Your HRA is funded by your employer, and your employer sets the rules for how those funds can be used.
    You cannot contribute to your HRA. It is owned, defined, and completely funded by your employer. It's one of the ways your employer helps you make healthcare more affordable.
    Your employer has set an annual limit for your HRA. Log into your EMPOWER account to see your HRA limit or ask your employer about the maximum amount made available to you under your particular HRA.
    Since your HRA is funded by your employer, the funds in your HRA belong to your employer when you resign, retire, or are terminated. Please view your Summary Plan Description or contact your employer for your specific rights to continue coverage when you leave your job or submit claims for expenses that have already been incurred.
    The terms of your particular HRA are defined by your employer. Please ask your employer whether your HRA funds roll over year to year. You may log in to your EMPOWER account to review your plan's details.
    It depends on your HRA program, which is designed and funded by your employer. Please review your employer's HRA program materials to determine if your spouse's and/or dependent(s)' medical expenses are eligible for reimbursement under your particular HRA.
    A Letter of Medical Necessity is the same as a Doctor's Statement. It's a letter written by your doctor, verifying that the medication you are buying with your Healthcare FSA is for a diagnosis, treatment, or prevention of a disease. This letter is required by the IRS for certain eligible expenses.
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